2015 Annual Report

Persistent Problem–Solvers

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At Reults for Development, we're committed to finding new ways to help people escape poverty and reach their full potential. Although the challenges we seek to address are massive and complex, we believe that solutions do exist. It's why we come to work every day.

We believe that with rigor, creativity and a network of partners, we can make a difference. On the pages that follow, you will see some of the challenges we focused on in 2015, and the progress we're making.

Read letters from our leadership.

In 2015, we pioneered and advanced solutions to tough development challenges within the fields of health, education and governance. Although we don't believe in a one-size-fits-all approach, we excel at combining six methodologies for maximum impact.

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  • Analyzing & Influencing
  • Building Communities
  • Increasing Access
  • Designing & Evaluating
  • Advancing Innovation
  • Supporting Change Agents
  • We collect data and conduct rigorous analysis in order to help funders and policymakers identify urgent issues, prioritize efforts, get more value for their investments and ensure that benefits reach the poor.
  • We create and facilitate lasting networks that bring together practitioners and policymakers with a common purpose to share ideas and information, identify and disseminate best practices and co-produce new knowledge products and tools.
  • We work with all segments of the marketplace — manufacturers, major donors, and buyers in the public and private sectors — to accelerate the availability and affordability of vital commodities and services.
  • We leverage the best of design thinking, structured experimentation, and rigorous quantitative and qualitative research methods to accelerate practitioner innovation, learning, adaptation and impact.
  • We aim to accelerate and scale up development impact with innovative solutions. We do this by identifying and facilitating new thinking for emerging and intractable problems, by creating new partnerships and disseminating new approaches for the global good.
  • We work shoulder-to-shoulder with government officials, civil society leaders and entrepreneurs to provide tools, advice and access to global networks to help them scale up their efforts.
01

Advancing Universal Health Coverage Through Joint Learning

  • Analyzing & Influencing
  • Building Communities
  • Supporting Change Agents

Challenge

Despite the fact that there is widespread support among global health donors, implementers and governments for universal health coverage (UHC), achieving UHC has not been easy or straightforward. One challenge policymakers and practitioners face is a lack of practical knowledge related to designing and implementing health-system reforms. Put simply: there is a lot of information available about what should be done to achieve UHC, but very little information about how to do it.

Progress

At Results for Development, we set out to solve this problem, guided by the core belief that people who have led or are leading health-system reforms are best positioned to help others in the same situation. In 2010, we helped launch the Joint Learning Network (JLN) — a member-driven community of global health policymakers and practitioners who are working together to collectively address barriers to achieving UHC. R4D currently serves as the network coordinator and the lead facilitator for two technical initiatives — the Primary Health Care Initiative and the Provider Payment Initiative — that enable members to focus on joint learning and problem solving around a particular set of implementation challenges.

In 2015, R4D helped expand JLN membership from nine countries to 24, facilitated a series of collaborative learning activities among member countries, and supported the co-development of new and practical knowledge products and tools. These include a guide that explains how governments can engage the private sector in primary health care delivery, a guide for assessing provider payment systems and an interactive tool for leveraging benefits policies for primary health care.

02

Preventing Child Deaths from Pneumonia

  • Analyzing & Influencing
  • Increasing Access

Challenge

Pneumonia is the leading killer of children under five globally. Approximately one million children under the age of 5 died from a pneumonia-related causes in 2015 — more than from HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined. And it’s not because we don’t know how to treat pneumonia or it’s too expensive to do so. In fact, there is a highly effective, affordable treatment (about $0.50 per course of treatment) that is recommended by the World Health Organization: amoxicillin dispersible tablets (amox DT). But access to this lifesaving commodity is a huge problem in many low- and middle-income countries.

Progress

Results for Development set out to find out why so many children are dying from pneumonia and to reverse this trend. To do this, we completed a diagnostic analysis that included country visits to Ethiopia, Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda (four countries with especially high burdens and low treatment rates) and interviews with more than 140 demand, supply and global actors across 65 organizations. We engaged all levels of the marketplace — procurers, manufacturers, distributors, donors and other key players — in order to identify the top barriers to accessing amox DT.

In all countries, we found similar factors, including demand-side barriers such as regulatory issues, problems with accurately forecasting and planning for needs and limited options for governments’ procurement processes. On the supply side, we found that manufacturers were not willing to engage in complex registration processes without clearer market information, including knowing what the demand was for the product. But the greatest challenge was the lack of funding for this important issue, which was particularly acute in Ethiopia and Tanzania where a 75 — 100 percent funding gap was predicted after 2015.

Armed with this data, we made the case to several global donors that large, time-limited investments could catalyze real and lasting change by permanently clearing market bottlenecks and galvanizing domestic support (and resources) to end child deaths from pneumonia. Due to the particularly high rates of untreated children in Ethiopia — only seven percent of the children under five with pneumonia symptoms are treated with antibiotics — and the strong political will demonstrated by the Ethiopian government to address this issue, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation committed $3 million to scale up treatment over five years.

This funding will lead to treatments for approximately four million children, but it will also remove access barriers and obstacles, thus enabling the Ethiopian government to continue to scale up treatment after the program ends. R4D has also continued to increase transparency in the global amox DT market to improve access, and has continued to advocate for greater prioritization and catalytic investments to address childhood pneumonia in other high-burden countries.

03

Scaling Up Innovative Education Programs

  • Analyzing & Influencing
  • Advancing Innovation
  • Supporting Change Agents

Challenge

Estimates suggest that 100 million children in low- and middle-income countries will not complete primary school, and another 250 million who are enrolled are not learning the basics in reading and math. These numbers underscore a pressing need for rapid, yet lasting, improvement in educational outcomes worldwide. There is a growing recognition that the status quo will not work. Encouragingly, evidence does exist of teachers, schools and occasionally whole systems beating the odds by producing educational outcomes well beyond reasonable expectations. But to optimally leverage such innovations we must identify, test, scale and document what works, so that others can learn from these experiences.

Progress

In order to identify, connect and support innovative education programs, Results for Development established the Center for Education Innovations (CEI) in 2013 — a network that has grown to include 700+ education programs and more than 50 funder organizations. We support this community by developing,curating and sharing actionable research, customized toolkits and implementation guides like the Early Learning Toolkit (earlylearningtoolkit.org).

Another way CEI supports promising programs is by connecting them with global education funders. In 2015, we worked with UNICEF to identify five innovative programs and provide critical support to them for strengthening and scaling up their models. At the same time, we documented their journey, including challenges they confronted and conditions that helped lead to success. Insights gained from each program’s journey were synthesized, yielding 10 recommendations for implementers, donors, policymakers and researchers to support innovation (see recommendations on previous page).

04

Investigating Whether Citizen Engagement Can Lead to Improved Maternal Health

  • Designing & Evaluating
  • Supporting Change Agents

Challenge

Public health services have expanded across much of the developing world in recent years, but quality and accessibility vary, and women and children are among the most susceptible to the effects of poor or nonexistent health care. Some tout transparency and accountability initiatives — social audits, public expenditure tracking surveys, citizen report cards, absenteeism studies and community scorecards, among others — as one way to empower communities to identify health care problems and hold the responsible parties or decision makers to account. But it’s unclear whether these interventions lead to improved health outcomes.

Progress

At Results for Development, we are working with the Harvard Kennedy School and other partners to lead a rigorous mixed-method evaluation to determine whether citizen empowerment and engagement can also lead to improved health outcomes, and if so, under what set of circumstances. In 2015, R4D worked with local partners in Tanzania and Indonesia to engage the citizens of 200 communities to identify key issues and challenges related to the health of mothers and babies. The communities subsequently developed social action plans to hold midwives, doctors and elected officials accountable for quality care. Now, R4D is evaluating whether this approach is working — and why or why not.

Although we won’t know whether the action plans led to improved maternal and child health for a few years (until new babies are born), several key insights have emerged from working with citizen groups:

  1. Small, balanced groups of citizens show signs of being especially effective;
  2. Citizen groups need to be equipped with the right information to create impactful interventions;
  3. Citizen groups are capable of designing interesting, out-of-the-box actions and show signs of being able to adapt, based on how targets respond.
05

Making the Case for Investing in Nutrition

  • Analyzing & Influencing

Challenge

Good nutritional status is linked to improved school-completion rates, higher household income and ultimately a greater chance at escaping the cycle of poverty. Despite the clear benefits, nutrition has historically been a relatively low priority for country governments and donor organizations. As a result, malnutrition continues to be an enormous challenge globally — and in some places, a crisis.

Progress

Part of the challenge has been that relatively little was known about what was actually being spent on nutrition at the global and country levels, how much more money is needed and how those resources could be mobilized. To address this lack of information, Results for Development, the World Bank and 1000 Days generated the first-ever Global Investment Framework for nutrition in 2015: "Investing in Nutrition; The Foundation for Development." The analysis shows that an additional average investment of $7 billion per year for the next 10 years is needed to achieve the World Health Assembly targets and save 3.7 million children’s lives. It also provides potential financing scenarios for scaling up nutrition programs so that high-burden governments, donors and new funding mechanisms can share costs equitably (see graph). In addition to saving lives, these resources could result in 65 million fewer stunted children and 265 million fewer women suffering from anemia. This analysis is being used to support global advocacy efforts.

This global work is complemented by R4D’s work at the country level. In India, R4D assessed government budgets for nutrition programs in the state of Rajasthan, to estimate the gap between resource needs and available funding. This analysis is being used to shape budgets and policy and improve nutritional outcomes. R4D’s work in India also includes documenting the successes and challenges faced by State Nutrition Missions, which serve as multi-sectoral coordinating bodies for nutrition efforts at the state level.

In Ethiopia, R4D is working closely with the Ministry of Health to map multi-sectoral nutrition investments in the country, to help ensure current investments are aligned with priorities in the National Nutrition Plan and support the government’s efforts to end malnutrition by 2030.

In Nigeria, R4D estimated the cost-effectiveness of community management of acute malnutrition (CMAM) — an approach that trains community volunteers to identify and initiate treatment for children with acute malnutrition before they become seriously ill — in four states in northern Nigeria where malnutrition rates are the highest. The study found that CMAM is highly cost-effective in this setting and confirmed to a donor the value of continuing to fund and scale up the effort in collaboration with the Nigerian government. R4D is currently conducting a similar costing exercise for the CMAM program that is being scaled in Rajasthan, India.

06

Harnessing Innovation for Sustainable Development

  • Analyzing & Influencing
  • Advancing Innovation
  • Designing & Evaluating
  • Building Communities

Challenge

New ideas and tactics for improving the lives of people in the developing world are emerging all the time. Yet, many promising ideas fail because of a lack of awareness or seed funding.

Progress

Results for Development serves as the secretariat for the International Development Innovation Alliance (IDIA), a platform that brings together the innovation teams of some of the world’s leading development actors, including UNICEF, the World Bank, Grand Challenges Canada, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Global Innovation Fund and the governments of the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, Sweden and Canada. IDIA’s goal is to advance innovation as a means to help achieve sustainable development. IDIA maintains four working groups, facilitated by R4D, on the topics of data platforms, measuring impact, scaling innovation and building capacity for innovation, in which IDIA members share knowledge and experience and come together to co-create solutions.

In July 2015, the members of IDIA published “A Call for Innovation in International Development,” outlining the need for innovation to address pressing development challenges and laying out six core principles to facilitate development innovation. In 2015, IDIA also supported the growth of USAID’s Global Innovation Exchange, including data harmonization, interoperability, governance recommendations and financing options. This open platform helps innovators and funders connect within a more efficient, data-rich knowledge ecosystem around innovation.

07

Evaluating Whether Learning Can Be Assessed By Citizens

  • Analyzing & Influencing
  • Designing & Evaluating

Challenge

"Are children learning?" is a question that should inform all education policy making. Yet in many countries, the answer to this question has remained largely unknown. One organization based in India (Pratham) is trying to change that with the use of citizen-led assessments. This innovative approach — which involves volunteers conducting household surveys to gauge children’s basic reading and math skills — has attracted interest for its potential to not only evaluate whether children are learning, but also for its potential to increase awareness of low learning outcomes and to stimulate actions to address the learning gap. But more evidence is needed on how effective citizen-led assessments are at measuring learning, the extent to which they stimulate awareness and action and ultimately, whether students are learning more.

Progress

In an effort to more deeply understand the citizen-led assessment model and to evaluate its effectiveness, Results for Development assessed active programs in India, Mali, Senegal, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda, and compiled ts findings in a 2015 report, "Bringing Learning to Light: The Role of Citizen-led Assessments in Shifting the Education Agenda."

R4D found that key metrics included in the assessments can be accurately measured by citizen volunteers. Although the assessments evaluate a limited set of competencies in reading and mathematics, they do yield valid results. Evidence suggests that the volunteers are well-equipped to reliably assess children’s basic competencies. Additionally, R4D found that the assessments have contributed to a greater focus on learning outcomes in global discourse and agenda setting, by providing evidence of the seriousness of the learning crisis and demonstrating how an inexpensive but effective model can be used to assess learning. The assessments have also increased awareness of the learning crisis at the national level, but generating concrete action to improve learning outcomes has proved challenging. Our analysis affirms areas in which citizen-led assessments have been successful, while also providing guidance for how they can be revised to improve learning outcomes in the future.

08

Moving toward Affordable, High-Quality Health Care in Ghana

  • Analyzing & Influencing
  • Supporting Change Agents

Challenge

Around the world, more and more countries are recognizing the importance of providing quality and affordable health care for all — otherwise known as universal health coverage (UHC) — and they are implementing policies and system-wide changes to achieve this. Ghana, in particular, has made extraordinary gains. In 2013, the country launched its National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS), which replaced a system that required patients to pay user fees at the point of service. However, although approximately 40 percent of Ghanaians are enrolled today, the system still faces challenges such as escalating care costs and inadequate use of evidence and monitoring and evaluation tools that would allow management to improve the quality and efficiency of health care.

Progress

Results for Development is heavily engaged across multiple facets of Ghana’s push toward UHC. This work includes providing advice and support to Ghana’s National Health Insurance Authority (NHIA) — the government body that oversees the NHIS.

In order to help the NHIS manage rising costs, R4D is advising and building capacity for the scaling up of capitation payments (the fixed, pre-arranged amount paid by the government to healthcare providers for services to individuals), aligning these payments with performance, and developing and managing preferred primary-care provider networks. The ultimate goal is a more sustainable financing model that emphasizes patient-centered primary health care.

To ensure that care is high-quality and efficient, we are working with the NHIA to improve their use of data and evidence in making strategic decisions. We guide our NHIA partners in developing dashboards that track key indicators and raise red flags using real-time data, in building robust operations research capacity that can quickly diagnose problems and make recommendations, and in re-designing long-term monitoring and evaluation and knowledge management practice.

09

Leveraging High-Quality Governance Data for Policy Reform

  • Analyzing & Influencing
  • Building Communities

Challenge

High-quality data on the different dimensions of governance — ranging from corruption perceptions to fiscal transparency to business regulation and freedom of the press — can shape policy reforms that have the potential to improve economic, human and democratic development. But the current state of governance data limits its potential impact.

On the whole, governance data are wildly incomplete, covering some countries and years but not others, and they are often produced with little to no understanding of who actually uses these data, and for what purpose. Additionally, production costs remain high, despite possibilities for economies of scale. No single organization can solve these problems alone.

Progress

In 2015, Results for Development launched the Governance Data Alliance, a collaboration that brings together 20+ organizations, including governance data producers, users and funders, to improve the availability and quality of data.

The Alliance aggregates high-quality governance data and encourages greater coordination among data producers, while simultaneously investigating who actually uses governance data, and what kinds of data they need and want. A new website that pulls existing data into one place — governancedata.org — enables users to use dashboards to easily access and compare data. The Alliance also commissioned a report, "Governance Data: Who uses it and why?", that looks at who uses governance data at the country level and what motivates them. The report drew upon the experience of 6,750 policymakers and produced three recommendations for data producers.

  1. Make content as actionable as possible;
  2. When diagnosing problems and identifying solutions, engage in-country actors in a more participatory process and;
  3. Target countries that already score relatively well on key governance indicators and have reform-minded policymakers.

In the future, the Alliance plans to expand its membership, support members with their data production and pilot joint data-collection efforts in under-assessed countries to test possibilities for economies of scale.

10

Reducing the Number of Out-of-School Children in Southeast Asia

  • Analyzing & Influencing

Challenge

Although significant progress has been made toward achieving universal primary education over the past decade, the prevalence of out-of-school children remains a pervasive global problem. According to UNESCO Institute for Statistics, there are nearly 58 million out-of-school children of primary-school age in the world, seven million of whom are in East Asia and the Pacific. While the region has made major strides toward achieving universal primary school enrollment, it will cost a great deal to maintain these gains and to go further. In these resource-constrained environments, policymakers face a host of competing development challenges. As a result, a strong economic case must be made for investing in out-of-school children.

Progress

In 2015, Results for Development set out to help education policymakers and decision makers gain a clear understanding of the significant economic losses associated with out-of-school children. R4D used two approaches. The first predicted how much will be lost as a percentage of each country’s GDP in the future, due to the lack of primary education of the children who are currently out of school. The second method computed the income gap out-of-school children will face, based on a regional model of the relationship between education attainment and aggregate income. Then we compared those estimates against additional public spending required to enroll out-of-school children (see the bar chart below).

The results were clear: There are significant economic incentives to educate out-of-school children in Southeast Asia — even for countries like Vietnam, with relatively low numbers of out-of-school children. The estimated earnings cost resulting from out-of-school children averages more than one percent of GDP in the seven countries included in the study, but varies substantially in the region, from around 0.1 percent of GDP in Vietnam to over four percent of GDP in Timor-Leste. Also, the estimated economic gain from enrolling all children in school outweighs the estimated increase in public spending required to enroll them. And on top of the economic benefits, there are a variety of non-market benefits (e.g., women’s empowerment, improved public health, democratization) that are not explicitly accounted for in the quantitative analysis, but should be considered when evaluating return on investment. R4D’s study, "The Economic Cost of Out-of-School Children in Southeast Asia," clearly makes the case for greater investment in primary education in Southeast Asia as a critical intervention to promote economic and social development.

11

Leveraging Learning and Evaluation in Program Design

  • Analyzing & Influencing
  • Advancing Innovation
  • Designing & Evaluating
  • Supporting Change Agents

Challenge

The traditional design and evaluation cycle for international development programs is measured in years. While evaluation provides important evidence and insights that can help guide future work, program managers also need advice and training on how to systematically and rigorously learn in real time and make timely decisions about program design and direction that can increase efficacy and reach.

Progress

In 2015, Results for Development and its partners launched a four-year initiative to improve monitoring, evaluation and learning (MERL) in international development projects. Through the initiative — called Rapid Feedback MERL — R4D is evaluating pilot programs within the US Agency for International Development that incorporate rapid experimentation and the use of evidence to adapt strategies and tactics. Current pilots include an initiative in Cambodia to prevent separation of children from their families and an initiative in India to improve TB detection and treatment across urban areas.

This initiative builds on R4D’s existing evaluation and learning portfolio, which leverages structured experimentation, coupled with monitoring and evaluation, to make mid-stream design decisions to improve outcomes. In Sierra Leone, we are working with a low-fee private school network to identify aspects of its literacy program that can be rapidly tested and adapted to improve outcomes. We are applying this "rapid testing cycle" approach in India as well, where a mobile phone application is being developed to encourage parents to read to kids. And we are working to improve the monitoring and evaluation practices of another program, also in India, that provides child care services in urban slums.

Financials

Since Results for Development was established in 2008, it has grown from a $2.6 million organization primarily focused on global health challenges in low- and middle-income countries to an organization with an annual revenue of $26 million and programs in a variety of fields, including health, education, governance and accountability, nutrition, water, sanitation and hygiene — as well as several cross-cutting programs that focus on the science of implementation, including how to advance innovation for greater impact and how to improve program design and delivery through experimentation and real-time feedback.

R4D’s most significant growth is the result of increasing grant revenue, which grew from $2M in 2007 to $14.3M in 2016. Many of these grants were multi-year awards from large and prestigious foundations and bilateral organizations from around the world.

FY15 Program Expenses by Sector
FY15 Program Sources of Revenue
Expenses for the Last 4 Years
Statement of Financial Position
FY15
Assets
Cash and cash equivalents$9,927,613
Grants and contracts receivable$7,555,243
Prepaid expenses$280,654
Deferred rent asset
Deposit
Property and equipment net$2,214,497
Total Assets$19,978,007
Liabilities and Net Assets
Accounts payable and accrued expenses$1,149,778
Accrued payrole$325,188
Grants payable$90,708
Deferred revenue$1,570,307
Deferred rent$2,464,799
Total Liabilities$5,600,780
Net Assets
Unrestricted$927,725
Temporarily restricted$13,449,502
Total Net Assets$14,377,227
Total Liabilities and Net Assets$19,978,007

Results for Development is a global nonprofit organization working with partners in more than 55 countries to find new ways to help people escape poverty and reach their full potential.

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Looking Back with David De Ferranti

When we started Results for Development (R4D) in 2008, we shared a growing concern with others in the field that the traditional ways of trying to help Africa, Asia and Latin America were not living up to expectations. The need to "do development differently" was gaining ground.

Read more.

Our goal for R4D was to bridge the gap between think tanks and implementers, combining analysis with on-the-ground partnerships to find what really works in practice — all aimed at creating better ways to solve tough development challenges. We believe that people have the best chance of escaping poverty and achieving their potential if they, not outsiders, are in the driver’s seat in the journey to overcome barriers and build stronger futures.

We’ve stayed true to these values and are proud of our progress so far. These are just a few examples of what we’ve achieved:

  • R4D’s focus on universal health coverage (UHC) has helped move that key issue to center stage in global health. The Joint Learning Network that we co-founded with global and country partners from around the world has helped practitioners learn from each other how to solve the practical challenges of getting to UHC. R4D is also directly advising several countries on health system reforms to achieve UHC.
  • R4D has helped to advance innovation by building online exchanges, including the Center for Education Innovations and The Center for Health Market Innovations, which have raised the profile of more than 2,000 innovative programs and provided critical support to many of them. We also helped create the International Development Innovation Alliance — a consortium of 11 major innovations funders who are working together to promote ground-breaking approaches to tough development challenges.
  • R4D’s initiatives on transparency and citizen participation, as instruments for fostering more open and effective governance, have helped over 60 local watchdog groups in 31 countries to improve millions oflives — by giving people access to better information about what their governments are doing.
  • R4D’s work on education and early childhood development is shedding new light on what works and what doesn’t. By conducting analysis to identify the areas of greatest need, we have helped donors determine where their resources can make the greatest impact, and directed millions of dollars towards increasing access to quality education in developing countries.
  • R4D’s analysis of procurement practices related to malaria bed nets and AIDS drugs have identified ways to save over a billion dollars — enough to help millions more poor people at no extra cost to taxpayers anywhere. Our contributions to finding more efficient ways to use funds to fight AIDS in Africa and Asia will potentially result in nine million fewer people being infected and $90 billion saved over the next two decades.

Now we are embarking on a major new phase of R4D’s development, as I hand over the role of president and CEO to Gina Lagomarsino, my colleague in co-creating R4D. Founders need to know when to go, and so when I recently turned 70, I decided that to ensure R4D will stand on its own and continue to thrive well beyond my time, I should step aside now. As I do so, R4D has never been stronger, with an annual budget of $26 million and a full-time staff of more than 100. From my new roles as chair of R4D’s board and a senior fellow, I will remain actively engaged in R4D’s work.

David De Ferranti

Founder

Outgoing President & CEO
As of September 1, 2016

Looking Forward with Gina Lagomarsino

David de Ferranti invited me to join him when he launched R4D in 2008. As one of the original managing directors and later as the chief operating officer, I worked with David and other senior leaders to build this organization — and I am thrilled to now take on the role of president and chief executive officer.

Read more.

I may be partial, but I think R4D is a special organization. Our people are a big part of that equation. We have an entrepreneurial culture that attracts talented experts who are committed to finding new ways to help people around the world achieve their full potential. One of my goals is to make sure R4D stays this way.

Building on the successes of R4D’s past, I’m excited to lead the organization in its next chapter.

I also want to ensure that R4D continues to make important contributions that improve the lives of people in low- and middle-income countries. All people should receive high-quality, affordable health care anchored by strong primary healthcare systems. Young children need education, health care and nutrition so they can thrive. Adolescents need the right skills to succeed in work and life. And citizens should have a voice in determining their own destiny, and transparency into how well their governments are working on their behalf.

R4D aims to bring a multi-sectoral view to these challenges, while continuing to be an organization that spans the divide between the thinkers and the doers.

Our approach is simple:
Analyze > Connect > Support

In every case, this work is done with an impressive global network of partners (see the full list on page 32). From academic institutions to global donor organizations to government agencies and local civil society organizations, we achieve more when we work together.

Building on the successes of R4D’s past, I’m excited to lead the organization in its next chapter.

Gina Lagomarsino

President & CEO

As of September 1, 2016